Globally Harmonized System (GHS)

Requirement

OSHA requires that all workers potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals be trained in an update to the hazardous communications regulations known as the Globally Harmonized System (GHS).

Course

The course will cover the elements that address the OSHA training requirements for GHS. Recognizing that many workers did not have adequate training in hazard communication or at least have not had recent training, the course will also provide basic/refresher training in the requirements of the HazCom regulations. The course length is approximately two hours. Topics covered will include:

  • Employer requirements under GHS
  • Why GHS is important to workers
  • Use of pictograms in classifying hazards
  • Elements of GHS-compliant labels
  • Elements of GHS-Compliant safety data sheets

Find a Trainer

  • To find a trainer in your area or to arrange for a class,  please contact PEC Safety’s Training Support Department at 844.848.5884 or trainingsupport@pecsafety.com.

Background

OSHA estimates that 40 million American workers may potentially be exposed to hazardous chemicals in their workplace. These workers fall under the “Right to Know” requirements contained in the hazardous communications regulations and must be trained in HazCom. Countries around the world, including the United States, have agreed to a common, standardized labeling and hazard classification system. OSHA has released the U.S. version of GHS and set the following deadlines for implementation:

  • By December 1, 2013: Train employees on new chemical labeling elements and Safety Data Sheet format.
  • By June 1, 2015: Comply with all GHS provisions for preparation of new hazardous chemical labels and safety data sheets.
  • By December 1, 2015: Use new GHS labeling elements for all hazardous chemicals being shipped.
  • By June 1, 2016: Update in-plant chemical labeling systems, HazCom program. Provide additional employee training for newly-identified hazards.

Job Safety Analysis (JSA)

Requirement

It is common for contractor personnel to be required to perform Job Safety Analysis (JSA) at worksites, but operators are increasingly concerned about the quality of those JSAs. Some operators now require that contractors put their personnel through JSA training. It is expected that the new revisions to the Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) regulations will make JSA training mandatory for all offshore personnel.

Course

The course is based on a combination of classroom training and exercises aimed at teaching the personnel how to work as a team in creating JSAs and watching out for each other’s safety. The class length is approximately two hours. It will cover basics of JSA:

  • The JSA triangle
  • JSA goals
  • Recognizing changing jobsite hazards
  • Common hazards
  • Commonsense JSA tips
  • Recognizing the JSA danger zone

The program is adaptable so that classes from different types of operations can learn the fundamentals of JSAs and classes from the same company or type of operation can focus on their company’s scope of work and JSA forms. Students will receive a JSA tip card that they can use in the field as they create JSAs.

Background

The concept of JSAs is relatively easy to explain. The problem is that workers do not appear to see the value of JSAs in keeping them safe. In preparing this course, PEC conducted extensive research, interviewed operators and contractors, consulted safety studies and reviewed existing JSA training. Based on this research, PEC has developed a course that engages crews, gives them simple concepts they can easily understand and gives them tools they take back to the job.

Delivery

Both the GHS and JSA courses will be offered through the PEC instructor network. These courses are being offered as classroom instruction because the teamwork aspects of JSAs and the need to gauge worker understanding of GHS do not make them good candidates for computer-based training. Existing PEC authorized instructors will be able to attend a webinar-based train-the-trainer session on both courses and receive all materials to instruct them. Students completing the course will receive certificates and their information will be entered into the PEC database where it can be archived and reviewed by operators who are evaluating contractor compliance.